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Clinical Toxicology publication: “Adverse events associated with pediatric exposures to dextromethorphan”. Objective: We sought to characterize adverse events associated with the most common over-the-counter (OTC) antitussive medication (dextromethorphan) in children <12 years old from a surveillance program of OTC cough/cold medication exposures.Conclusions: Adverse events most commonly affected the central nervous and autonomic systems and were most commonly associated with accidental overdose. Importantly, no fatalities associated with ingestion of dextromethorphan-only were detected. (Paul, et al. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2016 Oct 13:1-8 [Epub ahead of print])

Journal of Pediatrics, “Root causes, clinical effects, and outcomes of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine by young children”. The objective was to characterize the rates, root causes, and clinical effects of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine sublingual formulations among young children and to determine whether exposure characteristics differ between formulations. Data was collected via the RADARS System Poison Center Program and Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceutical’s pharmacovigilance system. Unintentional exposure to buprenorphine can cause central nervous system depression, respiratory depression, and death in young children. Exposure rates to film formulations are significantly less than to tablet formulations. Package and storage deficiencies contribute to unintentional exposures in young children. (Lavonas, et al. J Pediatr 2013; 163(5):1377-1383).

http://bit.ly/19vZvnh

“Expert guidance in developing institutional algorithms for snake envenomations management,” produced by Medscape Education in collaboration with RMPDC, was released in March, 2013. RMPDC Associate Director Eric Lavonas MD led a panel of envenomation experts that presented information about snakebite management and helped participants develop order sets for use in their own institutions. As of October, 4,800 physicians, nurses, and pharmacists had viewed the video, and 4,058 had taken the test for CME credit. The video is available through March, 2014, at

http://medscape.org/viewarticle/780335.

Just published in the current issue of The Journal of Pain, “Reduced Abuse, Therapeutic Errors, and Diversion Following Reformulation of Extended-Release Oxycodone in 2010”.

This study evaluated changes in abuse exposures, therapeutic error exposures, and diversion into illegal markets associated with brand extended-release oxycodone (ERO) following introduction of reformulated ERO using data from the RADARS® System Poison Center and Drug Diversion programs.

This article indicates that the abuse, therapeutic errors, and diversion of ERO declined following the introduction of a tamper-resistant reformulation of the product. Reformulating abused prescription opioids to include tamper-resistant properties may be an effective approach to reduce abuse of such products. (Severtson, et al. J Pain 2013; 14(10): 1122-1130).

Just published in the current issue of British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, “Prescription opioid abuse in the UK”.

This Letter to the Editors describes the increasing trend of prescription opioid-related mortality seen in the United Kingdom and Scotland. In particular, a striking rise in tramadol and methadone-related deaths is evident in both countries.

By acknowledging the trends in mortality related to prescription opioids, European countries have the opportunity to explore preventative measures and reinforce surveillance systems to track prescription opioid misuse (Giraudon, et al. Br J Clin Phamacol 2013; 76(5): 823-824).

Expert guidance in developing institutional algorithms for snake envenomations management,

produced by Medscape Education in collaboration with RMPDC, was released in March, 2013. RMPDC Associate Director Eric Lavonas MD led a panel of envenomation experts that presented information about snakebite management and helped participants develop order sets for use in their own institutions. As of October, 4,800 physicians, nurses, and pharmacists had viewed the video, and 4,058 had taken the test for CME credit. The video is available through March, 2014, at http://medscape.org/viewarticle/780335.

Consumer Reports said Thursday that poison control centers have now received almost 10,000 reports of children under 5 coming in contact with or ingesting colorful laundry pods

Candy-like laundry pods continue to attract kids

Jody Green, Ph.D., Director of Research Administration at the Rocky Mountain Poison Control Center – is the newly elected President of the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA)

http://www.socra.org/html/membersh.htm#SoCRA_Election_Results

Dr. George Wang – Doctors: Marijuana edibles pose danger to children

http://www.9news.com/news/local/article/334028/222/Doctors-Marijuana-edibles-pose-danger-to-children

Sam Wang and Michael Kosnett - Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center - Doctors Urge Child -Resistant Packaging For Pot Edibleshttp://denver.cbslocal.com/2013/03/07/doctors-urge-child-resistant-packaging-pot-edibles/

Sam Wang and Michael Kosnett - Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center - Doctors Urge Child -Resistant Packaging For Pot Edibleshttp://denver.cbslocal.com/2013/03/07/doctors-urge-child-resistant-packaging-pot-edibles/

Jody Green, Ph.D., Director of Research Administration at the Rocky Mountain Poison Control Center, reports New Pediatric Cough and Cold Medicine Safety Surveillance Findings at CDC/PROTECT http://www.icontact-archive.com/jTgV56c6qCRdt6YdTfGQzBxOiv6SR1zH?w=4#Campaign

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